Dehydration Part II

In continuation about water, it is also important during athletic training.  The body can lose 1 L or 33.8oz of water in an hour of exercise.  Hydrating before, during, and after is essential not only to ensure that there is no dehydration, but also increase healing time.

About a half hour before an event, one should consume 20-34 oz of water.  Throughout out the duration of an event it is beneficial to drink 4-6 ounces every 15 minutes.  After excersizing one should consume 30-60 ounces over the next several hours.  These recommendations are subjective to the person, but also to the event itself; walking for 30 minutes will require less water than running a marathon.

Before 30 min prior 20- 34 oz
During Every 10-15 min 4-6 oz
After 1-3 hours 30-60 oz

 

Other situations that require someone to drink more water include:

Hot Weather 8 oz per hour in the sun
Dry Weather 16 oz per day
Saunas 16 oz per 30 minutes
Tanning 16 oz per 15 minutes
Increased Salt 20 oz the next day
Stress Based on situation

 

The first four situations all have to do with your body releasing more water due to one’s environment.  Anytime you are dealing with hot weather, dry weather, saunas, or tanning- make sure to drink additional water to replenish the fluids naturally lost due to your surroundings.

Increased salt causes the body to retain water due to sodium’s molecular properties as well as throwing off the body’s natural electrolyte balance.  It is important to drink more water to bring back the body’s homeostasis, but the amount varies based on the intake of salt.  The day after you have consumed a salty meal, like Chinese food, increase your water intake to help flush out the system.

Stress comes in many forms and affects the body in many ways.  In addition to deep breathing techniques, meditation, walking, and journaling, increasing water intake can assist the body to adapt to the changes of stress more effectively.

 

References:

Vasey, Christopher, ND. “The Water Prescription” Healing Art Press. Vermont. 2006.

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